Connect with us

Hi, what are you looking for?

News

NYC is Building Anti-Migrant Streets. “Hostile Architecture” is Popping Up Around Asylum Shelters.

NYC is Building Anti Migrant Streets. Hostile Architecture is Popping Up Around Asylum Shelters.
Image Credit: Youtube - Cash Jordan

In recent months, New York City has grappled with a growing humanitarian crisis as increasing numbers of asylum seekers seek refuge within its borders. Amidst this backdrop, concerns have been raised regarding the emergence of hostile architecture in areas frequented by asylum seekers, sparking debates about the city’s approach to homelessness and urban design. Cash Jordan talks about it in his recent video.

Hostility on the Streets

Hostility on the Streets
Image Credit: Youtube – Cash Jordan

The phenomenon of hostile architecture involves the deliberate installation of urban elements designed to deter certain behaviors, often targeting vulnerable populations. In this video exposé by Cash Jordan, various instances of hostile architecture in proximity to asylum shelters are brought to light.

Uncovering the Motives: A Questionable Response

Uncovering the Motives A Questionable Response
Image Credit: Youtube – Cash Jordan

The video scrutinizes the motives behind the implementation of hostile architecture, particularly in locations near shelters catering to asylum seekers. Instances include the installation of spikes, oversized planters, removal of bike racks, and restricted access to public facilities. Jordan questions whether these measures are genuinely motivated by safety concerns or if they serve to deter homeless individuals from occupying public spaces.

Implications for Public Spaces and Social Equity

Implications for Public Spaces and Social Equity
Image Credit: United Liberty

The presence of hostile architecture raises broader questions about the accessibility and inclusivity of public spaces in urban environments. By prioritizing security over human welfare, critics argue that these measures exacerbate social inequalities and stigmatize marginalized communities. Moreover, the removal of essential amenities like public bathrooms further marginalizes vulnerable populations, compounding their hardship.

Balancing Safety and Compassion

Balancing Safety and Compassion 1
Image Credit: Youtube – Cash Jordan

As cities grapple with complex social issues, including homelessness and immigration, the ethical implications of hostile architecture come to the forefront. Is it morally justifiable to prioritize security measures over the well-being of those in need? Can cities strike a balance between ensuring public safety and demonstrating compassion towards vulnerable populations?

Homeless Deterants?

Homeless Deterants
Image Credit: Youtube – Cash Jordan

People in the comments share their thoughts: “NYC is doing everything BUT stopping accepting illegals for free and giving them debit cards”

Another commenter added some possible context: “No bro youre wrong. Those are homless deterants not migrant deternts. American citizens who are homeless, while the migrants are given hotel rooms, the homeless american is left to freeze”

A Public Hazard?

A Public Hazard
Image Credit: United Liberty

Some see the situation as completely illogical: “In a place where $100,000 a year is barely making it,  what level of idiot would think bringing people that can’t afford to feed themselves in mass there is going to be good! Sidewalks are not camp sites!”

One commenter added: “If anything, it looks like a public hazard. Someone tripping and falling, if they land their head on these sharp edges, lawsuit against the city. Overall, just dangerous and looks hideous.”

Seeking Solutions

Seeking Solutions
Image Credit: Youtube – Cash Jordan

The emergence of hostile architecture underscores the urgent need for alternative approaches to urban planning and homelessness intervention. Collaborative efforts involving government agencies, urban planners, advocacy groups, and affected communities are essential to devise holistic solutions that uphold dignity, promote inclusivity, and address the root causes of homelessness and displacement.

A Call for Dialogue and Action

A Call for Dialogue and Action
Image Credit: United Liberty

As discussions surrounding hostile architecture continue, it is imperative to foster dialogue and advocacy aimed at challenging inequitable urban practices. By prioritizing human-centric design principles and fostering empathy towards marginalized communities, cities like New York can strive towards creating more inclusive and compassionate urban landscapes for all residents.

A Reflection Of Broader Societal Attitudes

A Reflection Of Broader Societal Attitudes
Image Credit: United Liberty

What do you think? How do instances of hostile architecture in urban environments reflect broader societal attitudes towards homelessness and immigration?  What ethical considerations should inform decisions regarding urban design and the allocation of public resources in addressing homelessness and social inequality?

The Need For Public Safety

The Need For Public Safety
Image Credit: United Liberty

How can cities balance the need for public safety with the imperative to uphold the rights and dignity of marginalized populations? In what ways can communities advocate for more inclusive urban spaces and challenge the implementation of hostile architecture?

Tony Bonnani
Written By

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You May Also Like

News

In a recent debate over Safe Storage laws, a Democratic State Legislature member from Minnesota, Rep. Kaohly Vang Her (DFL), made a statement that...

Start

Are you up for the challenge that stumps most U.S. citizens? Test your knowledge with these 25 intriguing questions about American history’s Colonial Period....

History

Are you up for the challenge that stumps most American citizens? Test your knowledge with these 25 intriguing questions about the Colonial Period of...

News

In a recent report by the Market Gains channel, the host shared about the issue of minimum wage in California. Just a month ago,...